Darwinism Versus Creationism: One, Neither or Both?

William Petitt, Staff Writer

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In the standard high school science class in America, Darwinism and the Theory of Evolution is taught like the Bible in Church. However, this theory directly conflicts with the religious views of most Americans. Per Pew Research center, almost 71% of Americans in 2014 identify as Christian, and 6% of Americans identify with a religion outside Christianity such as Islam, Judaism, Buddhism or Hinduism. Why is a theory that has not been scientifically proved taught as fact in a country with an overwhelmingly religious population?

No matter what religion you align with, all religions have a creation story to answer one simple question: how did we all get here? Many people look at the Theory of Evolution is simply the disbelievers attempt to formulate the answer to that question. However, that is not necessarily true. In many cases, it can be seen how evolution can go hand in hand with creation. For example, in the Christian Bible, the Book of Genesis states that God creates the Earth in seven days, but evolution takes place over billions of years. 2 Peter 3:8 says, “But do not overlook this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.”  The Theory of Evolution does not discredit God. Who’s to say that God’s timetable is exactly the same as ours?

Furthermore, looking at the Bible as exact science is not its purpose. The purpose is to share the testimony of Jesus. So, it makes sense that the timetables do not add up or the numbers match. That would be contradictory to its purpose and make it more about solid fact, and less about what the whole Christian religion hangs upon:faith.

I think that in the public school system, you should be able to take classes on creationism just like you take classes on Darwinism and Evolution. It is not the school’s job to teach you what to believe, but inform you on everything and allow you to decide on your own. I also think that so much emphasis should not be put on the Theory of Evolution because it is just that: a theory.

Teaching religion in schools does not violate the First Amendment of Freedom of Religion. If the classes are voluntary, than students would be able to decide to take classes on their own for any belief system they might choose, rather it be Christianity or Islam. Or, if you are an atheist, you simply do not take one at all.

    In conclusion, teaching both Creationism and Evolution could reap benefits for the public school system as students could potentially grow in their faith if they choose to take a religious class, and be informed on the Theory of Evolution. Once again: it is not the school’s’ job to teach you what to believe, but to teach you everything and let you decide for yourself.

In the standard high school science class in America, Darwinism and the Theory of Evolution is taught like the Bible in Church. However, this theory directly conflicts with the religious views of most Americans. Per Pew Research center, almost 71% of Americans in 2014 identify as Christian, and 6% of Americans identify with a religion outside Christianity such as Islam, Judaism, Buddhism or Hinduism. Why is a theory that has not been scientifically proved taught as fact in a country with an overwhelmingly religious population?

No matter what religion you align with, all religions have a creation story to answer one simple question: how did we all get here? Many people look at the Theory of Evolution is simply the disbelievers attempt to formulate the answer to that question. However, that is not necessarily true. In many cases, it can be seen how evolution can go hand in hand with creation. For example, in the Christian Bible, the Book of Genesis states that God creates the Earth in seven days, but evolution takes place over billions of years. 2 Peter 3:8 says, “But do not overlook this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.”  The Theory of Evolution does not discredit God. Who’s to say that God’s timetable is exactly the same as ours?

Furthermore, looking at the Bible as exact science is not its purpose. The purpose is to share the testimony of Jesus. So, it makes sense that the timetables do not add up or the numbers match. That would be contradictory to its purpose and make it more about solid fact, and less about what the whole Christian religion hangs upon:faith.

I think that in the public school system, you should be able to take classes on creationism just like you take classes on Darwinism and Evolution. It is not the school’s job to teach you what to believe, but inform you on everything and allow you to decide on your own. I also think that so much emphasis should not be put on the Theory of Evolution because it is just that: a theory.

Teaching religion in schools does not violate the First Amendment of Freedom of Religion. If the classes are voluntary, than students would be able to decide to take classes on their own for any belief system they might choose, rather it be Christianity or Islam. Or, if you are an atheist, you simply do not take one at all.

    In conclusion, teaching both Creationism and Evolution could reap benefits for the public school system as students could potentially grow in their faith if they choose to take a religious class, and be informed on the Theory of Evolution. Once again: it is not the school’s’ job to teach you what to believe, but to teach you everything and let you decide for yourself.

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Darwinism Versus Creationism: One, Neither or Both?